This week I decided I wanted to experiment with Shapes in Tableau. I cannot help but think of big bags of money when I think of politics these days. I went to the Noun Project and found a bag of money with the UK Pound Sterling image. I showed the bags of money, the amounts […]

This week I decided I wanted to experiment with Slope Charts. The slope chart is the line chart’s fraternal twin. Line charts display three or more points in time while slope charts display exactly two points in time. Defined by Edward Tufte in his 1983 book The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, this type of […]

Monster Fatberg Ravages the London Sewage System A fatberg weighing the same as 11 double-decker buses and stretching the length of two football pitches is blocking a section of London’s aging sewage network. The congealed mass of fat, wet wipes and nappies is one of the biggest ever found and would have risked raw sewage […]

Readers: Last week was an exciting time for Tableau and Alteryx users. In Las Vegas here in the States, Alteryx was having their Inspire 2017 Conference. On the other side of the pond, Tableau was having their Tableau Conference on Tour in London. Sadly, I was not at either of them. However, I followed both […]

Henry Charles Beck (June 4, 1902 – September 18, 1974), known as Harry Beck, was an English engineering draftsman best known for creating the present London Underground Tube map in 1931. Beck drew up the diagram in his spare time while working as an engineering draftsman at the London Underground Signals Office. London Underground was initially skeptical […]

The Earliest Spot Map of All Dr. John Snow did not draw a map until December, 1854; the first spot map was produced in September of that year by Edmund Cooper, an engineer for the Metropolitan Commission of Sewers (see map below). Cooper’s investigation resulted from public complaints linking the sewers to the cholera outbreak. Rumors […]

During the mid-1800s, there were two major theories on the cause of cholera being debated widely in medical circles throughout London. The organism that caused cholera, Vibrio cholerae, was not yet known and would not be until 1883, twenty-five years after the death of John Snow. In that year, Robert Koch, a German physician and bacteriologist, […]