Category Archives: MicroStrategy

An Introduction to Data Blending – Part 4 (Data Blending Design Principles)

Readers:

In Part 3 of this series on data blending, we  examining the benefits of blending data. We also reviewed an example of data blending that illustrated the possible outcomes of an election for the District 2 Supervisor of San Francisco.

Today, in Part 4 of this series, we will discuss data blending design principles and show another illustrative example of data blending using Tableau.

Again, much of Parts 1, 2, 3 and 4 are based on a research paper written by Kristi Morton from The University of Washington (and others) [1].

You can learn more about Ms. Morton’s research as well as other resources used to create this blog post by referring to the References at the end of the blog post.

Best Regards,

Michael

Data Blending Design Principles

In Part 3, we describe the primary design principles upon which Tableau’s data blending feature was based. These principles were influenced by the application needs of Tableau’s end-user. In particular, we designed the blending system to be able to integrate datasets on-the-fly, be responsive to change, and driven by the visualization. Additionally, we assumed that the user may not know exactly what she is looking for initially, and needs a flexible, interactive system that can handle exploratory visual analysis.

Push Computation to Data and Minimize Data Movement

Tableau’s approach to data visualization allows users to leverage the power of a fast database system. Tableau’s VizQL algebra is a declarative language for succinctly describing visual representations of data and analytics operations on the data. Tableau compiles the VizQL declarative formalism representing a visual specification into SQL or MDX and pushes this computation close to the data, where the fast database system handles computationally intensive aggregation and filtering operations. In response, the database provides a relatively small result set for Tableau to render. This is an important factor in Tableau’s choice of post-aggregate data integration across disparate data sources – since the integrated result sets must represent a cognitively manageable amount of information, the data integration process operates on small amounts of aggregated, filtered data from each data source. This approach avoids the costly migration effort to collocate massive data sets in a single warehouse, and continues to leverage fast databases for performing expensive queries close to the data.

Automate as Much as Possible, but Keep User in Loop

Tableau’s primary focus has been on ease of use since most of Tableau’s end-users are not database experts, but range from a variety of domains and disciplines: business analysts, journalists, scientists, students, etc. This lead them to take a simple, pay-as-you-go integration approach in which the user invests minimal upfront effort or time to receive the benefits of the system. For example, the data blending system does not require the user to specify schemas for their data sets, rather the system tries to infer this information as well as how to apply schema matching techniques to blend them for a given visualization. Furthermore, the system provides a simple drag-and-drop interface for the user to specify the fields for a visualization, and if there are fields from multiple data sources in play at the  same time, the blending system infers how to join them to satisfy the needs of the visualization.

In the case that something goes wrong, for example, if the schema matching could not succeed, the blending system provides a simple interface for specifying data source relationships and how blending should proceed. Additionally, the system provides several techniques for managing the impact of dirty data on blending, which we discuss in more in Part 5 of this series.

Another Example: Patient Falls Dashboard [3]

NOTE: The following example is from Jonathan Drummey via the Drawing with Numbers blog site. The example uses Tableau v7, but at the end of the instructions on how he creates this dashboard in Tableau v7, Mr. Drummey includes instructions how the steps became more simplied in Tableau v8. I have included a reference to this blog post on his site in the reference section of my blog entry. The “I”, “me” voice you read in this example is that of Mr. Drummey.

As part of improving patient safety, we track all patient falls in our healthcare system, and the number of patient days – the total of the number of days of inpatient stays at the hospital. Every month report we report to the state our “fall rate,” a metric of the number of falls with injury for certain units in the hospital per 1000 patient days, i.e. days that patients are at the hospital. Our annualized target is to have less than 0.7 falls with injury per 1000 patient days.

A goal for our internal dashboard is to show the last 13 months of fall rates as a line chart, with the most recent fall events as a bar chart, in a combined chart, along with a separate text table showing some details of each fall event. Here’s the desired chart, with mocked-up data:

 

combo bars and lines

On the surface, blending this data seems really straightforward. We generate a falls rate very month for every reporting unit, so use that as the primary, then blend in the falls as they happen. However, this has the following issues:

  • Sparse Data – As I’m writing this, it’s March 7th. We usually don’t get the denominator of the patient days for the prior month (February) for a few more days yet, so there won’t be any February row of measure data to use as the primary to get the February fall events to show on the dashboard. In addition, there still wouldn’t be any March data to get the March fall events. Sometimes when working with blend, the solution is to flip our choices for the primary and secondary datasource. However, that doesn’t work either because a unit might go for months or years without a patient fall, so there wouldn’t be any fall events to blend in the measure data.
  • Falls With and Without Injury – In the bar chart, we don’t just want to show the number of patient falls, we want to break down the falls by whether or not they were falls with injury – the numerator for the fall rate metric – and all other falls. The goal of displaying that data is to help the user keep in mind that as important as it is to reduce the number of falls with injury, we also need to keep the overall number of falls down as well. No fall = no chance of fall with injury.
  • Unit Level of Detail – Because the blend needs to work at the per-unit level of detail as well as across all reporting units, that means (in version 7 at least) that the Unit needs to be in the view for the blend to work. But we want to display a single falls rate no matter how many units are selected.

Sparse Data

To deal with issue of sparse data, there are a few possible solutions:

  • Change the combined line and bar chart into separate charts. This would perhaps be the easiest, though it would require some messing about with filters, hidden reference lines, and continuous date axes to ensure that the two charts had similar axis ranges no matter what. However, that would miss out on the key capability of the combined chart to directly see how a fall contributes to the fall rate. In addition, there would be no reason to write this blog post. :)
  • Perform padding in the data source, either via a query/view or Custom SQL. In an earlier version of this project I’d built this, and maintaining a bunch of queries with Cartesian joins isn’t my favorite cup of tea.
  • Building a scaffold data source with all combinations of the month and unit and using the scaffold as the primary data source. While possible, this introduces maintenance issues when there’s a need for additional fields at a finer level of detail. For example, the falls measure actually has three separate fall rates – monthly, quarterly, and annual. These are generated as separate rows in our measures data and the particular duration is indicated by the Period field. So the scaffold source would have to include the Period field to get the data, but then that could be too much detail for the blended fall event data, and make for more complexity in the calculations to make sure the aggregations worked properly.
  • Do a tiny bit of padding in the query, then do the rest in Tableau via Show Missing Values aka domain padding. As I’d noted in an earlier post on blending, domain padding occurs before data is blended so we can pad out the measure data through the current date and then include all the falls. This is the technique I chose, for the reason that padding one row to the data is trivial and turning on Show Missing Values is a couple of mouse clicks. Here’s how I did that:

In my case, the primary data source is a Microsoft Access query that gets the falls measure results from a table that also holds results for hundreds of other metrics that we track. I created a second query with the same number of columns that returns Null for every field except the Measure Date, which has a value of 1/1/1900. Then a third query UNION’s those two queries together, and that’s what is used as the data source in Tableau.

Then, in Tableau, I added a calculated field called Date with the following formula:

//used for padding out display to today
IF [Measure Date] == #1/1/1900# THEN 
    TODAY() 
ELSE 
    [Measure Date] 
END

The measure results data contains a row per measure, reporting unit, and the period. These are pre-calculated because the data is used in a variety of different outputs. Since in this dashboard we are combining the results across units, we can’t just use the rate, we need to go back to the original numerator and denominator. So, I also created a new field for the Calculated Rate:

SUM([Numerator])/SUM([Denominator])

Now it’s possible to start building the line chart view:

  1. Put the Month(Date) – the full month/year version as a discrete – on Columns, Calculated Rate on Rows, Period on the Color Shelf. This only shows the data that exists in the data source, including the empty value for the current month (March in this case):

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 1.11.25 PM

 

  1. Turn on Show Missing Values for Month(Date) to start domain padding. Now we can see the additional column(s) for the month(s) – February in this case between January to the current month that Tableau has added in:

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 1.14.19 PM

 

With a continuous (green pill) date, this particular set-up won’t work in version 8. Tableau’s domain padding is not triggered when the last value of the measure is Null. I’m hoping this is just an issue with the beta, I’ll revise this section with an update once I find out what’s going on.

Even though the measure data only has end of month dates, instead of using Exact Date for the month I used Month(Date) because of two combined factors: One is that the default import of most date fields from MS Jet sources turns them into DateTime fields, the second is that Show Missing Values won’t work on an Exact Date for a DateTime field, you have to assign an aggregation to a DateTime (even Second will work). This is because domain padding at this level can create an immense number of new rows and cause Tableau to run out of memory, so Tableau keeps the option off unless you want it. Also note that you can turn on Show Missing Values for an Exact Date for a Date Field.

  1. Now for some cleanup steps: for the purposes of this dashboard, filter Period to remove Monthly (we do quarterly reporting), but leave in Null because that’s needed for the domain padding.
  2. Right-click Null on the Color Legend and Hide it. Again, we don’t exclude this because this would cause the extra row for the domain padding to fail.
  3. Set up a relative date filter on the Date field for the last 13 months. This filter works just fine with the domain padding.

Filtering on Unit

Here’s a complicating factor: If we add a filter on Unit, there’s a Null listed here:

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 1.18.31 PM

I’d just want to see the list of units. But if we filter that Null out, then we lose the domain padding, the last date is now January 2013:

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 1.18.58 PM

 

One solution here would be to alter the padding to add a padding row for every unit, instead of just one unit. Since Tableau doesn’t let us just hide elements in a filter, and we actually have more reporting units in our data than we are displaying on the dashboards, I chose to use a parameter filter because there are more reporting units in our production data than we are displaying on the dashboards, yet the all-unit rate needs to include all of the data. Setting this up included a parameter with All and each of the units, and a calculated field called “Chosen Unit Filter” with the following formula, that is set to Filter on False:

[Choose Unit] == "All" OR [Choose Unit] == [Unit]

Falls With and Without Injury

In a fantasy world, to create the desired stacked bars I’d be able to drag the Number of Records from the secondary datasource, i.e. the number of fall events, drag an Injury indicator onto the Color Shelf, and be done. However, that runs into the issue of having a finer level of detail in the secondary than in the primary, which I’ll walk through solutions for in the next section. In this case, since there are only two different numbers, the easy way is to generate two separate measures, then use Measure Names/Measure Values to create the stacked bars – Measure Values on Rows, and Measure Names on the Color Shelf. Here’s the basic calculation for Falls with Injury:

SUM(IF [Injury] != "None" THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)

We’re using a row-level calculated field to generate the measure, and a slightly different calc for Falls w/out Injury.

Unit Level of Detail

When we want to blend in Tableau at a finer level of detail and aggregate to a higher level, historically there have been three options:

  • Don’t use blending at all, instead use a query to perform the “blend” outside of Tableau. In the case that there are totally different data sources, this can be more difficult but not impossible by using one of the systems or a different system to create a federated data source, for example by adding your Oracle table as an ODBC connection to your Excel data, then making the query on that. In this case, we don’t have to do that.
  • Use Tableau’s Primary Groups feature “push” the detail from the secondary into the primary data source. This is a really helpful feature, the one drawback is that it’s not dynamic so any time there are new groupings in the secondary it would have to be re-run. Personally, I prefer automating as much as possible so I tend not to use this technique.
  • Set up the view with the needed dimensions in the view – on the Level of Detail Shelf, for example – and then use table calculations to do the aggregation. This is how I’ve typically built this kind of view.

Tableau version 8 adds a fourth option:

  • Tell Tableau what fields to blend on, then bring in your measures from the secondary.

I’ll walk through the table calculation technique, which works the same in version 7 and version 8, and then how to take advantage of v8′s new feature.

Using Table Calculations to Aggregate Blended Data

In order to blend the the falls data at the hospital unit level to make sure that we’re only showing falls for the selected unit(s), the Unit has to be in the view (on the Rows, Columns, or Pages Shelves, or on the Marks Card). Since we don’t actually need to display the Unit, the Level of Detail Shelf is where we’ll put that dimension. However, just adding that to the view leads to a bar for each unit, for example for April 2012 one unit had one fall with injury and another had two, and two units each had two falls without injury.

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-09 at 1.30.27 PM

 

To control things like tooltips (along with performance in some cases), it’s a lot easier to have a single bar for each month/measure. To do that, we turn to a table calculation, here’s the Falls w/Injury for v7 Blend calculated field, set up in the secondary data source:

IF FIRST()==0 THEN
	TOTAL([Falls w/Injury])
END

This table calculation has a Compute Using of Unit, so it partitions on the Month of Date. The IF FIRST()==0 part ensures that there is only one mark per partition. I’m using the TOTAL() aggregation here because it’s easier to set up and maintain. The alternative is to use WINDOW_SUM(), but in Tableau prior to version 7 there are some performance issues, so the calc would be:

IF FIRST()==0 THEN
	WINDOW_SUM(SUM(Falls w/Injury]), 0, IIF(FIRST()==0,LAST(),0))
END

The ,0 IIF(FIRST()==0,LAST(),0 part is necessary in version 7 to optimize performance, you can get rid of that in version 8.

You can also do a table calculation in the primary that accesses fields in the secondary, however TOTAL() can’t be used across blended data sources, so you’d have to use the WINDOW_SUM version.

With a second table calculation for the Falls w/out Injury, now the view can be built, starting with the line chart from above:

  1. Add Measure Names (from the Primary) to Filters Shelf, filter it for a couple of random measures.
  2. Put Measure Values on the Rows Shelf.
  3. Click on the Measure Values pill on Rows to set the Mark Type to Bar.
  4. Drag Measure Names onto the Color Shelf (for the Measure Values marks).
  5. Drag Unit onto the Level of Detail Shelf (for the Measure Values marks).
  6. Switch to the Secondary to put the two Falls for v7 Blend calcs onto the Measure Values Shelf.
  7. Set their Compute Usings to Unit.
  8. Remove the 2 measures chosen in step 1.
  9. Clean up the view – turn on dual axes, move the secondary axis marks to the back, change the axis tick marks to integers, set axis titles, etc.

This is pretty cool, we’re using domain padding to fill in for non-existent data and then having a blend happening at one level of detail while aggregating to another, just for the second axis. Here’s the v7 workbook on Tableau Public:

Patient Falls Dashboard - Click on Image to go to Tableau Public

Patient Falls Dashboard – Click on image above to go to Tableau Public

Tableau Version 8 Blending – Faster, Easier, Better

For version 8, Tableau made it possible to blend data without requiring the linking fields in the view. Here’s how I build the above v7 view in v8:

  1. Add Measure Names (from the Primary) to Filters Shelf, filter it for a couple of random measures.
  2. Put Measure Values on the Rows Shelf.
  3. Click on the Measure Values pill on Rows to set the Mark Type to Bar.
  4. Drag Measure Names onto the Color Shelf (for the Measure Values marks).
  5. Switch to the Secondary and click the chain link icon next to Unit to turn on blending on Unit.
  6. Drag the Falls w/Injury and Falls w/out Injury calcs onto the Measure Values Shelf.
  7. Remove the 2 measures chosen in step 1.
  8. Clean up the view – turn on dual axes, move the secondary axis marks to the back, change the axis tick marks to integers, set axis titles, etc.

The results will be the same as v7.

Next: Tableau’s Data Blending Architecture

—————————————————————-

References:

[1] Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau, University of Washington and Tableau Software, Seattle, Washington, March 2012, http://homes.cs.washington.edu/~kmorton/modi221-mortonA.pdf.

[2] Hans Rosling, Wealth & Health of Nations, Gapminder.org, http://www.gapminder.org/world/.

[3] Jonathan Drummey, Tableau Data Blending, Sparse Data, Multiple Levels of Granularity, and Improvements in Version 8, Drawing with Numbers, March 11, 2013, http://drawingwithnumbers.artisart.org/tableau-data-blending-sparse-data-multiple-levels-of-granularity-and-improvements-in-version-8/.

 

An Introduction to Data Blending – Part 3 (Benefits of Blending Data)

Readers:

In Part 2 of this series on data blending, we delved deeper into understanding what data blending is. We also examined how data blending is used in Hans Rosling’s well-known Gapminder application.

Today, in Part 3 of this series, we will dig even deeper by examining the benefits of blending data.

Again, much of Parts 1, 2 and 3 are based on a research paper written by Kristi Morton from The University of Washington (and others) [1].

You can learn more about Ms. Morton’s research as well as other resources used to create this blog post by referring to the References at the end of the blog post.

Best Regards,

Michael

Benefits of Blending Data

In this section, we will examine the advantages of using the data blending feature for integrating datasets. Additionally, we will review another illustrative example of data blending using Tableau.

Integrating Data Using Tableau

In Ms. Morton’s research, Tableau was equipped with two ways of integrating data. First, in the case where the data sets are collocated (or can be collocated), Tableau formulates a query that joins them to produce a visualization. However, in the case where the data sets are not collocated (or cannot be collocated), Tableau federates queries to each data source, and creates a dynamic, blended view that consists of the joined result sets of the queries. For the purpose of exploratory visual analytics, Ms. Morton (et al) found that data blending is a complementary technology to the standard collocated approach with the following benefits:

  • Resolves many data granularity problems
  • Resolves collocation problems
  • Adapts to needs of exploratory visual analytics

Figure 1 - Company Tables

Image: Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau. [1]

Resolving Data Granularity Problems

Often times a user wants to combine data that may not be at the same granularity (i.e. they have different primary keys). For example, let’s say that an employee at company A wants to compare the yearly growth of sales to a competitor company B. The dataset for company B (see Figure 1 above) contains a detailed quarterly growth of sales for B (quarter, year is the primary key), while company A’s dataset only includes the yearly sales (year is the primary key). If the employee simply joins these two datasets on yearly earnings, then each row from A will be duplicated for each quarter in B for a given year resulting in an inaccurate overestimate of A’s yearly earnings.

This duplication problem can be avoided if for example, company B’s sales dataset were first aggregated to the level of year, then joined with company A’s dataset. In this case, data blending detects that the data sets are at different granularities by examining their primary keys and notes that in order to join them, the common field is year. In order to join them on year, an aggregation query is issued to company B’s dataset, which returns the sales aggregated up to the yearly level as shown in Figure 1. This result is blended with company A’s dataset to produce the desired visualization of yearly sales for companies A and B.

The blending feature does all of this on-the-fly without user-intervention.

Resolves Collocation Problems

As mentioned in Part 1, managed repository is expensive and untenable. In other cases, the data repository may have rigid structure, as with cubes, to ensure performance, support security or protect data quality. Furthermore, it is often unclear if it is worth the effort of integrating an external data set that has uncertain value. The user may not know until she has started exploring the data if it has enough value to justify spending the time to integrate and load it into her repository.

Thus, one of the paramount benefits of data blending is that it allows the user to quickly start exploring their data, and as they explore the integration happens automatically as a natural part of the analysis cycle.

An interesting final benefit of the blending approach is that it enables users to seamlessly integrate across different types of data (which usually exist in separate repositories) such as relational, cubes, text files, spreadsheets, etc.

Adapts to Needs of Exploratory Visual Analytics

A key benefit of data blending is its flexibility; it gives the user the freedom to view their blended data at different granularities and control how data is integrated on-the-fly. The blended views are dynamically created as the user is visually exploring the datasets. For example, the user can drill-down, roll-up, pivot, or filter any blended view as needed during her exploratory analysis. This feature is useful for data exploration and what-if analysis.

Another Illustrative Example of Data Blending

Figure 2 (below) illustrates the possible outcomes of an election for District 2 Supervisor of San Francisco. With this type of visualization, the user can select different election styles and see how their choice affects the outcome of the election.

What’s interesting from a blending standpoint is that this is an example of a many-to-one relationship between the primary and secondary datasets. This means that the fields being left-joined in by the secondary data sources match multiple rows from the primary dataset and results in these values being duplicated. Thus any subsequent aggregation operations would reflect this duplicate data, resulting in overestimates. The blending feature, however, prevents this scenario from occurring by performing all aggregation prior to duplicating data during the left-join.

Figure 2 - San Francisco Election

Image: Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau. [1]

Next: Data Blending Design Principles

——————————————————————————————————–

References:

[1] Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau, University of Washington and Tableau Software, Seattle, Washington, March 2012, http://homes.cs.washington.edu/~kmorton/modi221-mortonA.pdf.

[2] Hans Rosling, Wealth & Health of Nations, Gapminder.org, http://www.gapminder.org/world/.

An Introduction to Data Blending – Part 2 (Hans Rosling, Gapminder and Data Blending)

Readers:

In Part 1 of this series on data blending, we began to explore the concepts of data blending as well as the life-cycle of visual analysis.

Today, in Part 2 of this series, we will dig deeper into how data blending works.

Again, much of Parts 1, 2 and 3 are based on a research paper written by Kristi Morton from The University of Washington (and others) [1].

You can learn more about Ms. Morton’s research as well as other resources used to create this blog post by referring to the References at the end of the blog post.

Best Regards,

Michael

Data Blending Overview

Data Blending allows an end-user to dynamically combine and visualize data from multiple heterogeneous sources without any upfront integration effort. [1] A user authors a visualization starting with a single data source – known as the primary – which establishes the context for subsequent blending operations in that visualization. Data blending begins when the user drags in fields from a different data source, known as a secondary data source. Blending happens automatically, and only requires user intervention to resolve conflicts. Thus the user can continue modifying the visualization, including bringing in additional secondary data sources, drilling down to finer-grained details, etc., without disrupting their analytical flow. The novelty of this approach is that the entire architecture supporting the task of integration is created at runtime and adapts to the evolving queries in typical analytical workflows.

A Simple Illustrative Example

In this section we will discuss a scenario in which three unique data sources (see left half of Figure 1 below for sample tables) are blended together to create the visualization shown in Figure 2 below. This is a simple, yet compelling mashup of three unique measures that tells an interesting story about the complexities of global infant mortality rates in the year 2000.

Figure 1

 

Image: Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau. [1]

In this example, the user wants to understand if there is a connection between infant mortality rates, GDP, and population. She has three distinct spreadsheets with the following characteristics: the first data source contains information about the infant mortality rates per 1000 live births for each country, the second contains information about each country’s total population, and the third source contains country-level GDP. For this analysis task, the user drags the fields, “Country or Area” and “Infant mortality rate per 1000 live births”, from her first data source onto the blank visual canvas. Since these fields were the first ones selected by the user, then the data source associated with these fields becomes the primary data source.

This action produces a visualization showing the relative infant mortality rates for each country. But the user wants to understand if there is a correlation between GDP and infant mortality, so she then drags the “GDP per capita in US dollars” field onto the current visual canvas from Data Table A. The step to join the GDP measure from this separate data source happens automatically: the blending system detects the common join key (ı.e. “Country or Area”) and combines the GDP data with the infant mortality data for each country. Finally, to complete her analysis task, she adds the “Population” measure from Data Table B, to the visual canvas, which produces the visualization in Figure 2 below associated with the blended data table in Figure 1.

 

Figure 2

Image: Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau. [1] 

Hans Rosling, Gapminder and Data Blending

The Gapminder World interactive graph below shows how long people live and how the number of children a woman has is affected by how much money they earn using different data sources.

Gapminder World for Windows

Image: Hans Rosling’s Wealth and Health of Nations (Gapminder.org) [2]

Hans RoslingIn the screenshot above, the y-axis shows us Children per women (total fertility) . The x-axis shows us Income per person (GDP/capita, PPP$ inflation-adjusted). The series data points (the bubbles) show us population for each country. If you were to click the Play button, you would see as an interactive “slide show” how countries have developed since 1800.

This demonstrates the flexibility of the data blending feature, namely that users can dynamically change their blended views by pivoting on different data sources and measures to blend in their visualizations.

In the screenshot below, Mr. Rosling explains how to use the interactive Gapminder World application.

Also, Mr. Rosling has provided Gapminder World Offline, which you can use to show animated statistics from your own laptop! It can be run on Windows, Mac and Linux. Here is a link to the download installation page on the Gapminder.org site.

And here is a link to the PDF for the Gapminder World Guide show above.

Gapminder World Guide

Image: Hans Rosling’s Gapminder World Guide (PDF) [2]

Next: Usage Scenarios and Design Principles

——————————————————————————————————–

References:

[1] Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau, University of Washington and Tableau Software, Seattle, Washington, March 2012, http://homes.cs.washington.edu/~kmorton/modi221-mortonA.pdf.

[2] Hans Rosling, Wealth & Health of Nations, Gapminder.org, http://www.gapminder.org/world/.

 

An Introduction to Data Blending – Part 1 (Introduction, Visual Analysis Life-cycle)

Readers:

Today I am beginning a multi-part series on data blending.

  • Parts 1, 2 and 3 will be an introduction and overview of what data blending is.
  • Part 4 will review an illustrative example of how to do data blending in Tableau.
  • Part 5 will review an illustrative example of how to do data blending in MicroStrategy.

I may also include a Part 6, but I have to see how my research on this topic continues to progress over the next week.

Much of Parts 1, 2 and 3 are based on a research paper written by Kristi Morton from The University of Washington (and others) [1].

Please review the source references, at the end of each blog post in this series, to be directed to the source material for additional information.

I hope you find this series helpful for your data visualization needs.

Best Regards,

Michael

Introduction

Tableau and MicroStrategy’s new Analytics Platform are commercial business intelligence (BI) software tools that support interactive, visual analysis of data. [1] 

Using a Web-based visual interface to data and a focus on usability, these tools enable a wide audience of business partners (IT’s end-users) to gain insight into their datasets. The user experience is a fluid process of interaction in which exploring and visualizing data takes just a few simple drag-and-drop operations (no programming skills or DB experience is required). In this context of exploratory, ad-hoc visual analysis, we will explore a feature originally introduced in Tableau v6.0, and in MicroStrategy’s new Analytics Platform v9.4.1 late last year (2013).

We will examine how we can integrate large, heterogeneous data sources. This feature is called data blending, which gives users the ability to create data visualization mashups from structured, heterogeneous data sources dynamically without any upfront integration effort. Users can author visualizations that automatically integrate data from a variety of sources, including data warehouses, data marts, text files, spreadsheets, and data cubes. Because data blending is workload driven, we are able to bypass many of the pain points and uncertainty in creating mediated schemas and schema-mappings in current pay-as-you-go integration systems.

The Cycle of Visual Analysis

Unlike databases, our human brains have limited capacity for managing and making sense of large collections of data. In database terms, the feat of gaining insight in big data is often accomplished by issuing aggregation and filter queries (producing subsets of data).

However, this approach can be time-consuming. The user is forced to complete the following tasks.

  1. Figure out what queries to write.
  2. Write the queries.
  3. Wait for the results to be returned back in textual format. And, then finally,
  4. Read through these textual summaries (often containing thousands of rows) to search for interesting patterns or anomalies.

Tools like Tableau and MicroStrategy help bridge this gap by providing a visual interface to the data. This approach removes the burden of having to write queries. The user can ask their questions through visual drag-and-drop operations (again, no queries or programming experience required). Additionally, answers are displayed visually, where patterns and outliers can quickly be identified.

Visualizations leverage the powerful human visual system to help us effectively digest large amounts of information and disseminate it quicker.

Cycle of Visual Analysis

Image: Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau. [1]

Figure 1, above, illustrates how visualization is a key component in turning information into knowledge and knowledge into wisdom.

Ms. Morton discusses the process as follows,

The process starts with some task or question that a knowledge worker (shown at the center) seeks to gain understanding. In the first stage, the user forages for data that may contain relevant information for their analysis task. Next, they search for a visual structure that is appropriate for the data and instantiate that structure. At this point, the user interacts with the resulting visualization (e.g. drill down to details or roll up to summarize) to develop further insight.

Once the necessary insight is obtained, the user can then make an informed decision and take action. This cycle is centered around and driven by the user and requires that the visualization system be flexible enough to support user feedback and allow alternative paths based on the needs of the user’s exploratory tasks. Most visualization tools, however, treat this cycle as a single, directed pipeline, and offer limited interaction with the user. Moreover, users often want to ask their analytical questions over multiple data sources. However, the task of setting up data for integration is orthogonal to the analysis task at hand, requiring a context switch that interrupts the natural flow of the analysis cycle. We extend the visual analysis cycle with a new feature called data blending that allows the user to seamlessly combine and visualize data from multiple different data sources on-the-fly. Our blending system issues live queries to each data source to extract the minimum information necessary to accomplish the visual analysis task.

Often, the visual level of detail is at a coarser level than the data sets. Aggregation queries, therefore, are issued to each data source before the results are copied over and joined in Tableau’s local in-memory view. We refer to this type of join as a post-aggregate join and find it a natural fit for exploratory analysis, as less data is moved from the sources for each analytical task, resulting in a more responsive system.

Finally, Tableau’s data blending feature automatically infers how to integrate the datasets on-the-fly, involving the user only in resolving conflicts. This system also addresses a few other key data integration challenges, including combining datasets with mismatched domains or different levels of detail and dirty or missing data values. One interesting property of blending data in the context of a visualization is that the user can immediately observe any anomalies or problems through the resulting visualization.

These aforementioned design decisions were grounded in the needs of Tableau’s typical BI user base. Thanks to the availability of a wide-variety of rich public datasets from sites like data.gov, many of Tableau’s users integrate data from external sources such as the Web or corporate data such as internally-curated Excel spreadsheets into their enterprise data warehouses to do predictive, what-if analysis.

However, the task of integrating external data sources into their enterprise systems is complicated. First, such repositories are under strict management by IT departments, and often IT does not have the bandwidth to incorporate and maintain each additional data source. Second, users often have restricted permissions and cannot add external data sources themselves. Such users cannot integrate their external and enterprise sources without having them collocated.

An alternative approach is to move the data sets to a data repository that the user has access to, but moving large data is expensive and often untenable. We therefore architected data blending with the following principles in mind: 1) move as little data as possible, 2) push the computations to the data, and 3) automate the integration challenges as much as possible, involving the user only in resolving conflicts.

Next: Data Blending Overview

——————————————————————————————————–

References:

[1] Kristi Morton, Ross Bunker, Jock Mackinlay, Robert Morton, and Chris Stolte, Dynamic Workload Driven Data Integration in Tableau, University of Washington and Tableau Software, Seattle, Washington, March 2012, http://homes.cs.washington.edu/~kmorton/modi221-mortonA.pdf.

Michael Saylor’s MicroStrategy World 2014 Keynote Presentation

Click on image to watch presentationClick on image to watch presentation

PRIME: MicroStrategy Announces Release of Cloud Based, In-Memory Analytics Service, Running at Multi-Terabyte Scale

MicroStrategy Cloud’s New Parallel Relational In-Memory Engine (PRIME) Provides High Performance On Big Data Allowing Companies to Build High-Scale, Easy-to-Use Information Driven Apps

Las Vegas, NV, January 28, 2014 – MicroStrategy® Incorporated (Nasdaq: MSTR), a leading worldwide provider of enterprise software platforms, today announced the availability of its new Parallel Relational In-Memory Engine (PRIME) option for the MicroStrategy Cloud™ at its annual user conference, MicroStrategy World 2014, in Las Vegas. MicroStrategy PRIME™ is a massively scalable, cloud-based, in-memory analytics service designed to deliver extremely high performance for complex analytical applications that have the largest data sets and highest user concurrency. Facebook has successfully built high value information-driven applications with the technology that powers MicroStrategy PRIME.

“Rising data volumes are fueling demand for compelling, easy-to-use analytical applications with the power to revolutionize existing business processes for thousands or tens of thousands of employees, customers, or partners,” said Michael Saylor, CEO, MicroStrategy Incorporated. “MicroStrategy PRIME has been built from the ground up to support the engineering challenges associated with development of these powerful new information-driven apps. This innovative service will allow organizations to derive maximum value from their information by making their Big Data assets actionable.”

Most organizations struggle to harness the value of the information in their Big Data stores due to poor performance. Big Data technologies can store large amounts of information, but distributing that information in an interactive manner to thousands of users with existing commercially available technologies is a huge challenge, often resulting in risky, multi-year projects. MicroStrategy PRIME breaks new ground by tightly coupling a state-of-the art visualization and dashboarding engine with an innovative massively parallel in-memory data store. This architecture allows companies to build highly interactive applications that deliver responses to hundreds of thousands of users in a fraction of the time and cost of other approaches. MicroStrategy PRIME acts as a performance accelerator, opening up the data in databases to a much larger user population, driving new demand for information.

MicroStrategy PRIME combines:

  • Massively parallel, distributed, in-memory architecture for extreme scale. MicroStrategy PRIME is built on an in-memory, highly distributed, massively parallel architecture, designed to run on cost effective commodity hardware. Complex analytics problems can be partitioned across hundreds of CPU cores and nodes to achieve unprecedented performance. MicroStrategy has worked closely with leading hardware vendors to take full advantage of today’s multi-core, high memory servers.
  • Tightly integrated dashboard engine for beautiful, easy-to-use applications. MicroStrategy PRIME includes a state-of-the-art dashboard and data exploration engine, built on the MicroStrategy Analytics Platform™. The visualization engine includes hundreds of optimizations designed specifically for the in-memory data store. This engine enables customers to build complete, immersive applications that deliver high-speed response.
  • Cloud-based delivery for rapid deployment. MicroStrategy PRIME is available as a service on MicroStrategy Cloud, MicroStrategy’s world-class Cloud Analytics platform. MicroStrategy Cloud offers a complete service, including the infrastructure, people and processes to enable customers to quickly and easily develop and deploy high-scale, information-driven applications.

About MicroStrategy Incorporated

Founded in 1989, MicroStrategy (Nasdaq: MSTR) is a leading worldwide provider of enterprise software platforms. The Company’s mission is to provide the most flexible, powerful, scalable and user-friendly platforms for analytics, mobile, identity and loyalty, offered either on premises or in the cloud.

The MicroStrategy Analytics Platform™ enables leading organizations to analyze vast amounts of data and distribute actionable business insight throughout the enterprise. Our analytics platform delivers reports and dashboards, and enables users to conduct ad hoc analysis and share their insights anywhere, anytime. MicroStrategy Mobile™ lets organizations rapidly build information-rich applications that combine multimedia, transactions, analytics, and custom workflows. The MicroStrategy Identity Platform™ (branded as MicroStrategy Usher™) provides organizations the ability to develop a secure mobile app for identity and credentials. The MicroStrategy Loyalty Platform™ (branded as MicroStrategy Alert) is a next-generation, mobile customer loyalty and engagement solution. To learn more about MicroStrategy, visit www.microstrategy.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

MicroStrategy, MicroStrategy Analytics Platform, MicroStrategy Mobile, MicroStrategy Identity Platform, MicroStrategy Loyalty Platform, MicroStrategy Usher, MicroStrategy Cloud and MicroStrategy PRIME are either trademarks or registered trademarks of MicroStrategy Incorporated in the United States and certain other countries. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

MicroStrategy to focus on customers, not ‘PowerPoint slides,’ at MicroStrategy World conference

Source: Chris Kanaracus, IDG News Service, PCWorld, Business & Finance Software

Paul Zolfaghari
President, MicroStrategy

While some vendor conferences can end up mired in technical minutiae, MicroStrategy believes it’s better to show, not tell customers how its BI (business intelligence) software works, according to its president, Paul Zolfaghari.

”More than 50 MicroStrategy customers will deliver presentations at the event, which has about 130 sessions planned in total, according to a statement. They include BMC Software, Flextronics, Nielsen, Panda Restaurant Group and Publicis Touchpoint Solutions.

Scheduled for keynotes are Facebook CIO Tim Campos and Gucci CIO Simone Pacciarini, who will discuss their use of Microstrategy technology.When it does discuss products at the event, Microstrategy plans to showcase its recently released Analytics Desktop, a self-service BI tool that is available at no charge, as well as its push into mobile BI, Zolfaghari said.

Mobility has transformed the BI market, in Zolfaghari’s view. Five or six years ago, companies largely ran some internal reports and rolled the results up the corporate food chain, he said. “What’s happened is BI has now moved massively outside of HQ.”

It’s also likely MicroStrategy will discuss the massively parallel in-memory computing architecture it’s been working on with Facebook. The technology should be commercially available from MicroStrategy later this year, showing up first in MicroStrategy’s cloud BI offering, according to Zolfaghari.

The conference comes as MicroStrategy, the industry’s last remaining large pure BI vendor, faces ever-stiffer competition from platform companies such as Oracle and SAP, as well as upstarts like Tableau and Birst.

But MicroStrategy is keeping an edge thanks to a number of key strategic decisions, according to a recently released Forrester Research report on the BI market.

”MicroStrategy has grown organically and architected its entire suite as a single platform,” analyst Boris Evelson wrote. “Forrester clients find that, after making the initial investment and effort in MicroStrategy, the reusability of all objects and the relational OLAP engine with drill-anywhere capability often result in a lower long-term total cost of ownership.”

Forrester clients are also having success rolling out mobile BI based on MicroStrategy’s platform, Evelson said.

But there’s some cause for concern over MicroStrategy’s “high reliance on a largely disappearing network of partners, many of which have been acquired,” for architectural components such as ETL (extract, transform and load), data quality and MDM (master data management), Evelson added.

Zolfaghari downplayed the impact of its partners being acquired, noting that Informatica, a major provider of such tools, remains independent. MicroStrategy also maintains “robust relationships” with companies such as IBM, SAP and Oracle, he said.

MicroStrategy World runs from Jan. 27-30.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for the IDG News Service. More by

Has MicroStrategy Toppled Tableau as the Analytics King?

MicroStrategy Analytics

In a recent TDWI article titled Analysis: MicroStrategy’s Would-Be Analytics King, Stephen Swoyer, who is a technology writer based in Nashville, TN, stated that business intelligence (BI) stalwart MicroStrategy Inc. pulled off arguably the biggest coup at Teradata Corp.’s recent Partners User Group (Partners) conference, announcing a rebranded, reorganized, and — to some extent — revamped product line-up.

One particular announcement drew great interest: MicroStrategy’s free version of its discovery tool — Visual Insight — which it packages as part of a new standalone BI offering: MicroStrategy Analytics Desktop.

With Analytics Desktop, MicroStrategy takes dead aim at insurgent BI offerings from QlikTech Inc., Tibco Spotfire, and — most particularly — Tableau Software Inc.

MicroStrategy rebranded its products into three distinct groups: the MicroStrategy Analytics Platform (consisting of MicroStrategy Analytics Enterprise version 9.4 — an updated version of its v9.3.1 BI suite); MicroStrategy Express (its cloud platform available in both software- and platform-as-a-service  subscription options; and MicroStrategy Analytics Desktop (a single-user, BI discovery solution). MicroStrategy Analytics Enterprise takes a page from Tableau’s book via support for data blendinga technique that Tableau helped to popularize.

“We’re giving the business user the tools to join data in an ad hoc sort of environment, on the fly. That’s a big enhancement for us. The architectural work that we did to make that enhancement work resulted in some big performance improvements [in MicroStrategy Analytics Enterprise]: we improved our query performance for self-service analytics by 40 to 50 percent,” said Kevin Spurway, senior vice president of marketing with MicroStrategy.

Spurway — who, as an interesting aside, has a JD from Harvard Law School — said MicroStrategy implements data blending in much the same way that Tableau does: i.e., by doing it in-memory. Previous versions of MicroStrategy BI employed an interstitial in-memory layer, Spurway said; the performance improvements in MicroStrategy Analytics Enterprise result from shifting to an integrated in-memory design, he explained.

“It’s a function of just our in-memory [implementation]. Primarily it has to do with the way the architecture on our end works: we used to have kind of a middle in-memory layer that we’ve removed.”

Spurway described MicroStrategy Desktop Analytics as a kind of trump card: a standalone, desktop-oriented version of the MicroStrategy BI suite — anchored by its Visual Insight tool and designed to address the BI discovery use case. Desktop Analytics can extract data from any ODBC-compliant data source. Like Enterprise Analytics, it’s powered by an integrated in-memory engine.

In other words: a Tableau-killer.

“That [Visual Insight] product has been out there but has always been kind of locked up in our Enterprise product,” he said, acknowledging that MicroStrategy offered Visual Insight as part of its cloud stack, too. “You had to be a MicroStrategy customer who obviously has implemented the enterprise solution, or you could get it through Express, [which is] great for some people, but not everybody wants a cloud-based solution. With [MicroStrategy Desktop Analytics], you go to our website, download and install it, and you’re off and running — and we’ve made it completely free.”

The company’s strategy is that many users will, as Spurway put it, “need more.” He breaks the broader BI market into two distinct segments — with a distinct, Venn-diagram-like area of overlap.

“There’s a visual analytics market. It’s a hot market, which is primarily being driven by business-user demand. Then there’s the traditional business intelligence market, and that market has been there for 20 years. It’s not growing as quickly, and there’s some overlap between the two,” he explained.

“The BI market is IT-driven. For business users, they need speed, they need better ways to analyze their data than Excel provides; they don’t want impediments, they need quick time to value. The IT organization cares about … things … [such as] traditional reporting [and] information-driven applications. Those are apps that are traditionally delivered at large scale and they have to rely on data that’s trusted, that’s modeled.”

If or when users “need more,” they can “step up” to MicroStrategy’s on-premises (Enterprise Analytics) or cloud (Express) offerings, Spurway pointed out. “The IT organization has to support the business users, but they also need to support the operationalization of analytics,” he argued, citing the goal of embedding analytics into the business process. “That can mean a variety of things. It can mean a very simple report or dashboard that’s being delivered every day to a store manager in a Starbucks. They’re not going to need Visual Insight for something like that — they’re not going to need Tableau. They need something that’s simplified for everyday usage.”

MicroStrategy Analytics Powerful

Something More, Something Else

Many in the industry view self-service visual discovery as the culmination of traditional BI.

One popular narrative holds that QlikTech, Tableau, and Spotfire helped establish and popularize visual discovery as an (insurgent) alternative to traditional BI. Spurway sought to turn this view on its head, however: Visual discovery, he claimed, “is a starting point. It draws you in. The key thing that we bring to the table is the capability to bridge the gap between traditional model, single-version-of-the-truth business intelligence and fast, easy, self-service business analytics.”

In Spurway’s view, the usefulness or efficacy of BI technologies shouldn’t be plotted on a linear time-line, e.g., anchored by greenbar reports on the extreme left and culminating in visual discovery on the far right. Visual discovery doesn’t complete or supplant traditional BI, he argued, and it isn’t inconceivable that QlikTech, Tableau, and Spotfire — much like MicroStrategy and all of the other traditional BI powers that now offer visual discovery tools as part of their BI suite — might augment their products with BI-like accoutrements.

Instead of a culmination, Spurway sees a circle — or, better still, a möbius strip: regardless of where you begin with BI, at some point — in a large enough organization — you’re going to traverse the circle or (as with a möbius strip) come out the other side.

There might be something to this. From the perspective of the typical Tableau enthusiast, for example, the expo floor at last year’s Tableau Customer Conference (TCC), held just outside of Washington, D.C. in early September, probably offered a mix of the familiar, the new, and the plumb off-putting. For example, Tableau users tend to take a dim view of traditional BI, to say nothing of the data integration (DI) or middleware plumbing that’s associated with it: “Just let me work already!” is the familiar cry of the Tableau devotee. However, TCC 2013 played host to several old-guard exhibitors — including IBM Corp., Informatica Corp., SyncSort Inc., and Teradata Corp. — as well as upstart players such as WhereScape Inc. and REST connectivity specialist SnapLogic Inc.

These vendors weren’t just exhibiting, either. As a case in point, Informatica and Tableau teamed up at TCC 2013 to trumpet a new “strategic collaboration.” As part of this accord, Informatica promised to certify its PowerCenter Data Virtualization Edition and Informatica Data Services products for use with Tableau. In an on-site interview, Ash Parikh, senior director of emerging technologies with Informatica, anticipated MicroStrategy’s Spurway by arguing that organizations “need something more.” MicroStrategy’s “something more” is traditional BI reporting and analysis; Informatica’s and Tableau’s is visual analytic discovery.

“Traditional business intelligence alone does not cut it. You need something more. The business user is demanding faster access to information that he wants, but [this] information needs to be trustworthy,” Parikh argued. “This doesn’t mean people who have been doing traditional business intelligence have been doing something wrong; it’s just that they have to complement their existing approaches to business intelligence,” he continued, stressing that Tableau needs to complement — and, to some extent, accommodate — enterprise BI, too.

“From a Tableau customer perspective, Tableau is a leader in self-service business intelligence, but Tableau [the company] is very aware of the fact that if they want to become the standard within an enterprise, the reporting standard, they need to be a trusted source of information,” he said.

Among vendor exhibitors at TCC 2013, this term — “trusted information” or some variation — was a surprisingly common refrain. If Tableau wants to be taken seriously as an enterprisewide player, said Rich Dill, a solutions engineer with SnapLogic, it must be able to accommodate the diversity of enterprise applications, services, and information resources. More to the point, Dill maintained, it must do so in a way that comports with corporate governance and regulatory strictures.

“[Tableau is] starting to get into industries where audit trails are an issue. I’ve seen a lot of financial services and healthcare and insurance businesses here [i.e., at TCC] that have to comply with audit trails, auditability, and logging,” he said. In this context, Dill argued, “If you can’t justify in your document where that number came from, why should I believe it? The data you’re making these decisions on came from these sources, but are these sources trusted?”

Mark Budzinski, vice president and general manager with WhereScape, offered a similar — and, to be sure, similarly self-serving — assessment. Tableau, he argued, has “grown their business by appealing to the frustrated business user who’s hungry for data and analytics anyway they can get it,” he said, citing Tableau’s pioneering use of data blending, which he said “isn’t workable [as a basis for decision-making] across the enterprise. You’re blending data from all of these sources, and before you know it, the problem that the data’s not managed in the proper place starts to rear its ugly head.”

Budzinski’s and WhereScape’s pitch — like those of IBM and Teradata — had a traditional DM angle. “There’s no notion of historical data in these blends and there’s no consistency: you’re embedding business rules at the desktop, [but] who’s to say that this rule is the same as the [rule used by the] guy in the next unit. How do you ensure integrity of the data and [ensure that] the right decisions were made? The only way to do that is in some data warehouse-, data mart-[like] thing.”

Stephen Swoyer can be reached at stephen.swoyer@spinkle.net.

Data Archaeology Selected as One of the 2014 MicroStrategy World Dashboard Contest Winners

Click here to learn more about MicroStrategy World 2014Hello Readers:

Data Archaeology, Inc.I just found out I am one of the 2014 winners of the MicroStrategy World Dashboard Contest. I was also one of the winners last year.

I get a free pass to MicroStrategy World in Las Vegas which is the last week of this month. Last year, they gave us awards too. Not sure yet if they will do the same this year.

An Exploration of Tax Data

My dashboard is an exploration of tax data. It explores taxes rates for the top ten counties in terms of GDP.

I used horizontal stacked bar charts instead so that the viewer can visually see how social security and income tax rate add up to the total and explains visually why the countries are ordered the way they are on the dashboard. I also separated out $100K and $300K percentages into separate visuals.

In addition, I added the flags of the countries. Yes, I know, chart junk!

Now, you don’t see any numbers on the data points in this dashboard. The reason you don’t see them is because they appear when you mouse over a bar where you then see the country, category and the percent value as a tooltip.

Here is a screenshot of my entry. It was written with MicroStrategy v9.3.1, Report Services and the Visualization SDK.

Best regards,

Michael

Click on image to enlarge

DA_An_Exploration_of_Tax_Data

MicroStrategy Introduces Free Analytics Tool for the Desktop

MicroStrategy Analytics YouTube

MicroStrategy Analytics YouTube Video – Click Here

Last Tuesday, October 22, 2013, MicroStrategy revamped and expanded its line of BI software to incorporate big-data analytics and desktop visualization.

“We’re delivering a substantial new set of functionality,” said Kevin Spurway, MicroStrategy’s vice president of industry and mobile marketing.

The company has rebranded and upgraded its flagship BI application, now called the MicroStrategy Analytics Platform, and has introduced a new desktop application designed to allow business analysts to easily parse large data sets from different sources.

MicroStrategy Analytics Enterprise 9.4, a significant upgrade from MicroStrategy 9.3.1, includes a new capability the company calls data blending, which allows users to combine data from more than one source; the software stores the data in working memory without the need for a separate data integration product.

“Previously, we were able to combine data from different sources, but it required work from IT. Now any business user can grab data from different sources and bring them together with only a few clicks,” Spurway said.

Also new: The dashboard panel has been upgraded. It now can update data in real-time and can display multimedia files such as videos.

The new platform comes with a range of connectors for various types of big-data repositories. It can connect with the MongoDB NoSQL data store as well as Hadoop distributions from Hortonworks, Intel and Pivotal.

Analytics Enterprise now comes with the R statistical programming language, increasingly used for statistical analysis. Geographic Information System (GIS) software and service vendor Esri have provided a set of map skins and cartographic markers that can be used for geographic renditions of data sets.

MicroStrategy also has improved the performance of the software. The application can now fit 10 times as much data in memory as the previous version could, and the self-service querying now runs up to 40 percent faster.

In addition to updating its core enterprise software, MicroStrategy has also released a free tool to help business analysts fetch data from various sources and copy it directly to their desktops.

With the newly released MicroStrategy Analytics Desktop, users can grab data from relational databases, multidimensional databases, cloud-based applications and Hadoop deployments. Once on the desktop, the data can then be compiled into visualizations, such as basic pie charts, maps, graphs and various matrices.

You can click on the image below to download the software.

MicroStrategy Analytics Desktop Features

Click here to download free software

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