Author Archive: Michael

Infographics Related to Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 from The Daily Mail Online

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2697010/Faces-innocent-victims-Melbourne-real-estate-agent-wife-student-leading-AIDS-doctors-confirmed-dead-Flight-MH17-terrorist-attack-killed-298-people-board.html

Click on images to enlarge

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Infographic: Facts about Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17

Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 crashed in eastern Ukraine yesterday, carrying 283 passengers and 15 crew members from the Netherlands to Malaysia.

The infographic below from the UK website, The Conversation, shows confirmed information as of 8:24am BST today.

Ukrainian authorities had closed airspace up to 32,000ft. Despite this, the aircraft’s flight route was declared safe by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). MH17 was flying at 33,000ft when it was hit by a surface-to-air missile.

The aircraft did not make a distress call.

Facts About MH17 Infographic

WIRED: A Redesigned Parking Sign So Simple That You’ll Never Get Towed

web-snow-day-1

Your car gets towed, and who do you blame? Yourself? God no, you blame that impossibly confusing parking sign. It’s a fair accusation, really. Of all the questionable communication tools our cities use, parking signs are easily among the worst offenders. There are arrows pointing every which way, ambiguous meter instructions and permit requirements. A sign will tell you that you can park until 8 am, then right below it another reading you’ll be towed. It’s easy to imagine that beyond basic tests for legibility, most of these signs have never been vetted by actual drivers.

Like most urban drivers, Nikki Sylianteng was sick of getting tickets. During her time in Los Angeles, the now Brooklyn-based designer paid the city far more than she would’ve liked to. So she began thinking about how she might be able to solve this problem through design. She realized that with just a little more focus on usability, parking signs could actually be useful. “I’m not setting out to change the entire system,” she says. “It’s just something that I thought would help frustrated drivers.” [1]

Sylianteng notes: [2]

I’ve gotten one-too-many parking tickets because I’ve misinterpreted street parking signs. The current design also poses a driving hazard as it requires drivers to slow down while trying to follow the logic of what the sign is really saying. It shouldn’t have to be this complicated.

The only questions on everyone’s minds are:
1. “Can I park here now?”
2. “Until what time?”

My strategy was to visualize the blocks of time when parking is allowed and not allowed. I kept everything else the same – the colors and the form factor – as my intention with this redesign is to show how big a difference a thoughtful, though conservative and low budget, approach can make in terms of time and stress saved for the driver. I tried to stay mindful of the constraints that a large organization like the Department of Transportation must face for a seemingly small change such as this.

01 two-step

The sign has undergone multiple iterations, but the most recent features a parking schedule that shows a whole 24 hours for every day of the week. The times you can park are marked by blocks of green, the times you can’t are blocked in a candy-striped red and white. It’s totally stripped down, almost to the point of being confusing itself. But Sylianteng says there’s really no need for the extraneous detailed information we’ve become accustomed to. “Parking signs are trying to communicate very accurately what the rules actually are,” she says. “I’ve never looked at a sign and felt like there was any value in knowing why I couldn’t park. These designs don’t say why, but the ‘what’ is very clear.”

Sylianteng’s design still has a way to go. First, there’s the issue of color blindness, a factor she’s keenly aware of. The red and green are part of the legacy design from current signs, but she says it’s likely she’d ultimately change the colors to something more universal like blue. Then there’s the fact that urban parking is a far more complex affair than most of us care to know. There’s an entire manual on parking regulations; and Sylianteng’s design does gloss over rules concerning different types of vehicles and space parameters indicating where people can park. She’s working on ways to incorporate all of that without reverting back to the information overload she was trying to avoid in the first place. [1]

redesigned-parking-inline2

Sylianteng also posted on her blog an illustration of the problem in terms of biocost, as part of her Cybernetics class with Paul Pangaro. [2]

Biocost_ParkingSign

Sylianteng has been going around Manhattan and Brooklyn hanging up rogue revamped parking signs. “A friend of mine called it functional graffiti,” she says. She’ll stick a laminated version right below the city-approved version and ask drivers to leave comments. In that way, Sylianteng’s design is still a ways away from being a reality, but so far, she’s gotten pretty good feedback. “One person wrote: ‘The is awesome. The mayor should hire you.’” [1]

————————————————————————

Sources:

[1] Liz Stinson, A Redesigned Parking Sign So Simple That You’ll Never Get Towed, Wired, July 15, 2014, http://www.wired.com/2014/07/a-redesigned-parking-sign-so-simple-youll-never-get-towed-again.

[2] Nikki Sylianteng, blog, http://nikkisylianteng.com/project/parking-sign-redesign/.

Infographic: The Deadliest Animal in the World

Readers:

Bill GatesThis infographic is from Bill Gates’ blog from back in April of this year. It is probably more disturbing to see we are the second most dangerous animal in the world. The mosquito, which is very small, kills the most.

Here is part of what Bill notes.

 

What would you say is the most dangerous animal on Earth? Sharks? Snakes? Humans?

Of course the answer depends on how you define dangerous. Personally I’ve had a thing about sharks since the first time I saw Jaws. But if you’re judging by how many people are killed by an animal every year, then the answer isn’t any of the above. It’s mosquitoes.

When it comes to killing humans, no other animal even comes close.

What makes mosquitoes so dangerous? Despite their innocuous-sounding name—Spanish for “little fly”—they carry devastating diseases. The worst is malaria, which kills more than 600,000 people every year; another 200 million cases incapacitate people for days at a time. It threatens half of the world’s population and causes billions of dollars in lost productivity annually. Other mosquito-borne diseases include dengue fever, yellow fever, and encephalitis.

There are more than 2,500 species of mosquito, and mosquitoes are found in every region of the world except Antarctica. During the peak breeding seasons, they outnumber every other animal on Earth, except termites and ants. They were responsible for tens of thousands of deaths during the construction of the Panama Canal. And they affect population patterns on a grand scale: In many malarial zones, the disease drives people inland and away from the coast, where the climate is more welcoming to mosquitoes.

Considering their impact, you might expect mosquitoes to get more attention than they do. Sharks kill fewer than a dozen people every year and in the U.S. they get a week dedicated to them on TV every year. Mosquitoes kill 50,000 times as many people, but if there’s a TV channel that features Mosquito Week, I haven’t heard about it.

That’s why we’re having Mosquito Week on the Gates Notes.

I hope you find this as interesting as I do.

Best regards,

Michael

BiggestKillers_final_v8_no-logo

Infographic: The Illustrated Game – A Map Of World Cup Brazil 2014

Source: Haydn Simons, The Illustrated Game – A Map Of World Cup Brazil 2014, November 28, 2013, http://www.haydnsymons.com/news/the-illustrated-game-a-map-of-world-cup-brazil-2014/.

Haydn’s comments on creating this infographic:

Personally, I can’t think of anything better than illustration mixed with sport, or even better, football! While on Twitter the other day I stumbled across an online publication which features illustration and football, which showcases some great work, so I decided to try my hand at it too. After getting in touch with Joe, we decided that I would produce a guest illustration of Brazil World Cup 2014 map, showing the stadiums which are going to be used for the tournament. After researching (and seeing how much it’s going to cost Brazil!) I sketched out my idea from my sketchbook into this final illustrated map. The map includes stadiums like Rio De Janeiro, a fantastic stadium which overlooks the great city, where the final will be based. I really enjoyed researching about the World Cup 2014, and look forward to producing another illustration for ‘The Illustrated Game’. Be sure to check out their tumblr blog, it’s well worth a look at some great illustration on show.

brazil-world-cup-stadiums-illustrated-map

Infographic: American Flags (1767 – Present)

American Flags

Steve Heller, Alberto Cairo, and The World in Terms of General Motors

World in Terms of GM Cutout

Readers:

The other day on Twitter, Albert Cairo tweeted about a great visual map he found in a 1938 issue of Fortune Magazine at Steve Heller’s Moving Sale on Saturday, June 28th, 2014 in New York City.

Alberto Cairo GM Tweet

Daily Heller Moving Sale

Steve Heller

Steve HellerSteven Heller wears many hats (in addition to the New York Yankees): For 33 years he was an art director at the New York Times, originally on the OpEd Page and for almost 30 of those years with the New York Times Book Review. Currently, he is co-chair of the MFA Designer as Author Department, Special Consultant to the President of SVA for New Programs, and writes the Visuals column for the New York Times Book Review.

He is the co-founder and co-chair (with Lita Talarico) of the MFA Designer as Author program at the School of Visual Arts, New York, where he lectures on the history of graphic design. Prior to this, he lectured for 14 years on the history of illustration in the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program at the School of Visual arts. He also was director for ten years of SVA’s Modernism & Eclecticism: A History of American Graphic Design symposiums.

The World in Terms of General Motors

The visual in the December 1938 issue of Fortune Magazine was called The World in Terms of General Motors. It depicted a sketch map showing the location of (then) GM’s 110 plants. The spheres representing each plant are proportional (in volume) to their normal number of workers. The key numbers of the spheres are indexed on the map. The map does not include those manufacturing plants in which GM has less than 50% stock. The principal ones are Ethyl Gasoline Corp., Bendix Aviation Corp., Kinetic Chemicals, Inc., and North American Aviation, Inc.

Not shown are GM’s many non-manufacturing interests, domestic warehouses, etc.

So, finally, here is the complete map.

Enjoy!

Michael

[Click on the map image to enlarge]

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Happy Independence Day From Data Archaeology

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DataViz Humor: Bad Grammar Pie Chart

Bad Grammer Pie Chart

Infographic: Apple iPhone 5S vs. Samsung Galaxy S4

Iphone-5s-vs-Samsung-s41

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