Infographic: Alcatraz, 75 Years


  • Title: Alcatraz, 75 years
  • Language: Spanish
  • Angel García (Design)
  • Nelson Xuyá (Art Direction)
  • Brenda Martínez (Research)

Infographic about Alcatraz

Infographics: Banned and Challenged Books


This was originally published on Ebook Friendly by Piotr Kowalczyk. Piotr is the founder of Ebook Friendly. He is an Ebook enthusiast, technology geek, iPhone artist, and self-published author from Poland.



Best banned books infographics

These infographics about banned and challenged books help draw attention to the harms of book censorship.

Books are the best companion of everyone who wants to learn and become better – on condition we have unrestricted access to them.

Books are banned or challenged for moral, political, religious, or commercial reasons.

Once the book is banned, readers have either limited or no access to it.

Every year, during the last week of September, a major event is held that promotes the freedom to read. Banned Books Week brings together librarians, educators, publishers and readers who unite to draw attention to the harms of censorship.

On the website of American Library Association you can read more about Banned Books Week, find the list of frequently challenged books, download promotional materials, and report a book challenge.

Infographics play a growing role in raising the awareness about book banning. In this overview, we collected the best visuals created in the recent years.

You’ll find below the infographics from Love Reading, which are a two-volume definitive guide to most banned and challenged books.

Other infographics focus on highlighting facts and figures about book banning, not only in the U.S. but also worldwide. There are also visuals that put banned books on a historical timeline. Thanks to that you will see which books were banned – and for how long – in various countries.

Please note that this page may load slowly due to a large number of big image files. Click or tap on the infographics to see them in full resolution.

Banned and challenged books by the numbers #infographic

While most of the visuals in this overview present selected banned books, this one, prepared by  Simply Novel, gathers general facts about banned books. What’s more, these facts are up-to-date.

85% of book challenges went unreported and received no media attention. 9 out of 10 challenges were initiated by parents. Six from the top 10 books challenged in 2014 were from YA category.

The infographic also includes a list of top reasons for book challenges in 2012-2014.

The definitive guide to banned books volume 1 #infographic

Published by a UK-based book recommendation website Lovereading, the infographic lists most popular books that at some point, and in some countries, were banned.

Each book comes with a summary of the plot, the date of a first release, and most importantly – the reason to ban it.

There are books in the chart that you wouldn’t believe were banned. Just have a look at Alice in Wonderland. In the 30s of the last century, the Chinese Censor General thought attributing human intelligence to animals was “an insult to humanity”, and that children should be protected from the negative influence of the book. 

The definitive guide to banned books volume 2 #infographic

The second part of the epic project by Lovereading to highlight the most banned books throughout history and across the globe.

Take a closer look: Harry Potter was banned in various states of the U.S. – for promoting witchcraft.

The most controversial books in the world #infographic

Books and controversies go hand in hand, and this infographic shared on lists the most controversial titles.

Some more facts about To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s one of the most challenged classics of all time, according to American Library Association. Reasons: racial slurs, profanity, and blunt dialog. The book still ranks at number 21 of the 100 most frequently challenged books of 2000–2009.

Banned comic books and graphic novels #infographic

Created by Tim Leong for Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, the visualization shows a breakdown of reasons to ban various comic books and graphic novels.

This chart shows reasons specifically provided by the libraries. Most comics were challenged for sexual content, offensive language, and violence.

Top 10 banned novels in the U.S. #infographic

The infographic was created by BookPal, an online store offering quantity discounts on books bought in bulk.

Each of the ten books banned in the U.S. is presented comes complete with the reasons for banning it, as well as a number of challenges: by year and reason.

It’s good to observe that book banning is a downward trend. Most books were challenged in the mid-nineties. Since that time the numbers are going down.

Top banned books throughout history #infographic

Besides listing top banned books, this infographic, designed by Printer Inks, puts the censored books in a timeline. Thanks to that you can see when and for how long the book was banned in a particular country.

You can also find in the visual the books forbidden in schools, as well as ridiculous reasons to ban them.

Timeline of banned books #infographic

Here is another graph that shows banned books throughout history. It was designed by Giulia R. De Amicis and is a part of the infographic book published by Cassel Illustrated.

The visual is not available in a high-resolution, but the trends are visible already. 30 most banned books are compared on a timeline with the reasons to ban them, the countries, and the time.

As you see, the most common reason to ban the book (the time interval is between the 8th century and today) is anti-islamic content. Obscenity and heresy follow it.

I am with the banned #infographic

A great infographic created by Robert E. Kennedy Library. The most interesting part compares the U.S. states by the number of reported challenges. California, Texas, and Florida are the top three states.

The visual lists also top 100 banned books in the U.S. from 2000 to 2009. Each book is accompanied by the dots representing the reasons to challenge it.

Infographic: Easter Island: How Did They Move?


  • Fernando Baptista (Design)
  • Mathew Twombly (Design)
  • Patricia Healy (Design)
  • Debbie Gibbons (Design)

Infographic: 11 Awesome Data Visualizations Way Ahead of Their Time


Veronica Johnson from recently sent me this infographic that I want to share with you.

If you or your company have any insightful infographics or data visualizations you would like me to share, please feel free to e-mail them to me at

All the best,



Dataviz: Periodic Table of U.S. Coins


PCGS CoinFacts has just released a poster of their Periodic Table of U.S. Coins. Here is the link to order it on Amazon.

Below are some screenshots from the poster.



Periodic Table US Coins

Periodic Table US Coins CloseupPeriodic Table US Coins Legend

Infographic: 4th of July by the Numbers (History Channel)


Infographic: 2020 Internet of Things (IoT)


Infographic: Murders of Marvel


In honor of the Phoenix Comicon which is going on in downtown Phoenix this weekend, I thought I would shared an infographic related to comic books. The UK-based Morph Costumes recently created this infographic that ranks a number of Marvel characters by their kills. No character is left unscathed as it features both good and bad guys, as well-known as Iron Man and a bit more obscure like Malekith the Accursed.

I am more of a DC Comics guy than Marvel, but several of these were surprises. Hopefully, seeing the “hit list” will encourage you to read the comic series about the various characters.

Enjoy and happy comic reading!

Best regards,



New York Times DataViz: 1.5 Million Missing Black Men

Source: JUSTIN WOLFERS, DAVID LEONHARDT and KEVIN QUEALY, 1.5 Million Missing Black Men, New York Times, The Upshot, April 20, 2015,

MMBM1In New York, almost 120,000 black men between the ages of 25 and 54 are missing from everyday life. In Chicago, 45,000 are, and more than 30,000 are missing in Philadelphia. Across the South — from North Charleston, S.C., through Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi and up into Ferguson, Mo. — hundreds of thousands more are missing.

They are missing, largely because of early deaths or because they are behind bars. Remarkably, black women who are 25 to 54 and not in jail outnumber black men in that category by 1.5 million, according to an Upshot analysis. For every 100 black women in this age group living outside of jail, there are only 83 black men. Among whites, the equivalent number is 99, nearly parity.

African-American men have long been more likely to be locked up and more likely to die young, but the scale of the combined toll is nonetheless jarring. It is a measure of the deep disparities that continue to afflict black men — disparities being debated after a recent spate of killings by the police — and the gender gap is itself a further cause of social ills, leaving many communities without enough men to be fathers and husbands.

Perhaps the starkest description of the situation is this: More than one out of every six black men who today should be between 25 and 54 years old have disappeared from daily life.

“The numbers are staggering,” said Becky Pettit, a professor of sociology at the University of Texas.

And what is the city with at least 10,000 black residents that has the single largest proportion of missing black men? Ferguson, Mo., where a fatal police shooting last year led to nationwide protests and a Justice Department investigation that found widespread discrimination against black residents. Ferguson has 60 men for every 100 black women in the age group, Stephen Bronars, an economist, has noted.

MMBM2The gap in North Charleston, site of a police shooting this month, is also considerably more severe than the nationwide average, as is the gap in neighboring Charleston. Nationwide, the largest proportions of missing men generally can be found in the South, although there are also many similar areas across the Midwest and in many big Northeastern cities. The gaps tend to be smallest in the West.

Incarceration and early deaths are the overwhelming drivers of the gap. Of the 1.5 million missing black men from 25 to 54 — which demographers call the prime-age years — higher imprisonment rates account for almost 600,000. Almost 1 in 12 black men in this age group are behind bars, compared with 1 in 60 nonblack men in the age group, 1 in 200 black women and 1 in 500 non-black women.

Higher mortality is the other main cause. About 900,000 fewer prime-age black men than women live in the United States, according to the census. It’s impossible to know precisely how much of the difference is the result of mortality, but it appears to account for a big part. Homicide, the leading cause of death for young African-American men, plays a large role, and they also die from heart disease, respiratory disease and accidents more often than other demographic groups, including black women.

MMBM3Several other factors — including military deployment overseas and the gender breakdown of black immigrants — each play only a minor role, census data indicates. The Census Bureau’s undercounting of both African-Americans and men also appears to play a role.

The gender gap does not exist in childhood: There are roughly as many African-American boys as girls. But an imbalance begins to appear among teenagers, continues to widen through the 20s and peaks in the 30s. It persists through adulthood.

MMBM4The disappearance of these men has far-reaching implications. Their absence disrupts family formation, leading both to lower marriage rates and higher rates of childbirth outside marriage, as research by Kerwin Charles, an economist at the University of Chicago, with Ming-Ching Luoh, has shown.

The black women left behind find that potential partners of the same race are scarce, while men, who face an abundant supply of potential mates, don’t need to compete as hard to find one. As a result, Mr. Charles said, “men seem less likely to commit to romantic relationships, or to work hard to maintain them.”

The imbalance has also forced women to rely on themselves — often alone — to support a household. In those states hit hardest by the high incarceration rates, African-American women have become more likely to work and more likely to pursue their education further than they are elsewhere.

The missing-men phenomenon began growing in the middle decades of the 20th century, and each government census over the past 50 years has recorded at least 120 prime-age black women outside of jail for every 100 black men. But the nature of the gap has changed in recent years.

Since the 1990s, death rates for young black men have dropped more than rates for other groups, notes Robert N. Anderson, the chief of mortality statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Both homicides and H.I.V.-related deaths, which disproportionately afflict black men, have dropped. Yet the prison population has soared since 1980. In many communities, rising numbers of black men spared an early death have been offset by rising numbers behind bars.

It does appear as if the number of missing black men is on the cusp of declining, albeit slowly. Death rates are continuing to fall, while the number of people in prisons — although still vastly higher than in other countries — has also fallen slightly over the last five years.

But the missing-men phenomenon will not disappear anytime soon. There are more missing African-American men nationwide than there are African-American men residing in all of New York City — or more than in Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Detroit, Houston, Washington and Boston, combined.

MMBM5More information about this analysis can be found in an article about the methodology.


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